Jeffrey L. Page

Musical Theatre Dance Program | Director

Jeffrey Page is an opera and theatre director of both classical and contemporary works. As director and choreographer, he spearheaded the 2015 and 2018 Tokyo productions of the musical Memphis, which received four Yomiuri Award nominations, including Best Musical. The first African American to be named the Marcus Institute Fellow for Opera Directing at The Juilliard School, he has also been nominated for an Emmy Award. Mr. Page has won an MTV Video Music Award for his work with Beyoncé, whose creative team has included him for more than 12 years. His work was featured on Beyoncé’s “The Formation World Tour,” in her historic Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival performance, and in two of her HBO specials. Mr. Page was the associate creative director for Mariah Carey’s “Sweet, Sweet Fantasy” European Tour, and has been a featured choreographer on Fox Television’s “So You Think You Can Dance.” Mr. Page was in the original, award-winning Broadway cast of Fela! (Eugene O’Neill Theatre). He worked alongside Tony Award-winning composer Jeanine Tesori to choreograph the hit Broadway musical Violet starring Sutton Foster (Roundabout Theatre Company). At the Barrington Theatre Company, Mr. Page received glowing reviews as the choreographer for Company, and received a 2016 Berkshire Theater Award for his work on Broadway Bounty Hunter. In 2016, he established Movin’ Legacy as an Indianapolis-based nonprofit organization dedicated to the ethnology and documentation of contemporary and traditional dance from Africa and the African diaspora. Jeffrey holds a Master’s of Fine Arts degree, with a concentration in Theatre Directing from Columbia University in New York City; has been awarded the Chuck Davis Emerging Choreographer Fellowship from the Brooklyn Academy of Music; and is an alumnus of The School at Jacob’s Pillow. Most recently he finished working on Mlima’s Tale by Lynn Nottage alongside Mark Lamos, and currently he is working with Diane Paulus and the American Repertory Theatre at Harvard University to mount the Broadway production of 1776.